The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that people aged 55 and older accounted for 26% of the estimated 1.2 million people living with diagnosed or undiagnosed HIV infection in the United States in 2013. In older adults, HIV is too often diagnosed late in the course of the infection, leading to shorter HIV-to-AIDS intervals. CDC reports that in 2014, 40% of people aged 55 and older were diagnosed with AIDS at the time of HIV diagnosis.

With advanced treatment options, HIV positive individuals are living longer lives. However, the interactions between aging and degeneration caused by HIV have become a public health concern that needs to generate appropriate awareness and education.

In 2008, the AIDS Institute launched National HIV & Aging Awareness Day (NHAAD) to bring awareness to the issues the aging population faces regarding HIV and AIDS.  Each year on September 18, NHAAD is observed to call attention to the challenges that older Americans face in terms of HIV prevention, testing, care, and treatment.

For more information, please visit the following resources:

HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness
http://www.nhaad.org/

HIV.gov – National HIV/AIDS & Aging Awareness Day
https://www.hiv.gov/events/awareness-days/aging

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – National HIV/AIDS & Aging Awareness Day
https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/library/awareness/nhaaad.html

The AIDS Institute – National HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness
http://www.theaidsinstitute.org/programs/education/national-hivaids-and-aging-awareness-nhaaa